Monthly Archives: November 2013

Is Emma RGIII or Richie Incognito?

Some of the dramas in Jane Austen can also be found in the NFL.

Posted in Austen (Jane) | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Prufrock Illustrated?!

An illustrated “Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”? What next?!

Posted in Eliot (T.S.) | Tagged , | 1 Comment

When Father Carves the Turkey

Carving the Thanksgiving fowl can be an adventure.

Posted in Wright (E. V.) | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Discovering the Bad Girl Within

My student’s project on literary bad girls looks at “Jane Eyre,” Toni Morrison’s “Sula,” and Margaret Atwood’s “Alias Grace.”

Posted in Atwood (Margaret), Bronte (Charlotte), Morrison (Toni), Stevenson (Robert Louis) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

JFK as Ancient Greek Hero

Ancient Greek literature provides us with a power lens through which to examine the John F. Kennedy assassination.

Posted in Aeschylus, Euripides, Homer, Sophocles | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vonnegut’s Sci Fi, a Response to PTSD

Kurt Vonnegut’s science fiction can be seen as a way of coping with his PTSD.

Posted in Vonnegut (Kurt) | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Layla Dancing in a Globe of Light

Some of the great religious poetry turns to sexual imagery to capture the ecstatic union with the divine.

Posted in Alawi (Ahmad al-), Schuon (Frithjof) | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Manning vs. Brady, Hector vs. Achilles

Once again Manning and Brady square off, reminding us of Achilles and Hector.

Posted in Homer | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Looking Back to a Time When Hope Waved

Lucille Clifton’s poem on looks back to a time of hope–before the Kennedy assassination.

Posted in Clifton (Lucille) | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Lit’s 10 Most Painful Marriage Proposals

Literature 10 most painful marriage proposals.

Posted in Alcott (Louisa May), Austen (Jane), Bronte (Charlotte), Chaucer (Geoffrey), Defoe (Daniel), Gay (John), Hardy (Thomas), Tolstoy (Leo), Wilde (Oscar) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Poetic Guides through Cultural Devastation

Indian poets are necessary to keep cultural identity alive and to forge new paths in a white world.

Posted in Silko (Leslie Marmon) | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Jane Eyre’s Critique of the 1%

The critique in “Jane Eyre” of privileged classes who attack the poor anticipates today’s political scene.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Haiyan, Climate Change Denial, & Lear

“King Lear” gives us language to describe Typhoon Haiyan and also a framework to understand climate change denialism.

Posted in Shakespeare (William) | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Poetry – A Finite Image of Infinity

Frithjof Schuon explores how poetry echoes the divine.

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Miami Locker Room, Lord of the Flies

Richie Incognito may have played Jack in “Lord of the Flies” to Jonathan Martin’s Piggy.

Posted in Ballantyne (R. M.), Golding (William) | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Sarah (Malaprop) Palin vs. Obamacare

Sarah Palin’s attack on Obamacare sounds as though it were delivered by Mrs. Malaprop.

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A Judge’s Love Affair with Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust has made Stephen Breyer a better Supreme Court justice.

Posted in Proust (Marcel) | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

The 10 Most Unreliable Narrators

Here’s a list of some of literature’s great unreliable narrators.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 3 Comments

Poetry Is Not a Luxury

Poetry Audre Lorde makes a practical case for visionary poetry.

Posted in Lorde (Audre) | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Caution: Don’t Stereotype Immigrants

William Carlos Williams has a poem that prompts us to see beyond immigrant stereotypes.

Posted in Williams (William Carlos) | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Reminder Not to Forget War’s Ravages

Kipling’s “Recessional” curiously isn’t the imperialistic war poem that would have expected at Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee.

Posted in Kipling (Rudyard) | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Martin = Copperfield, Incognito = Steerforth

The scene in “David Copperfield” where Steerforth bullies a sensitive teacher provides insight into the Miami Dolphins’ Incognito-Martin case.

Posted in Dickens (Charles) | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Two Parables Involving Falling Leaves

Scott Bates and Lucille Clifton find poetic lessons in falling leaves.

Posted in Bates (Scott), Clifton (Lucille) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

For Sontag, Purpose of Lit Was Change

Susan Sontag loved literature because she craved “new blood and new nourishment and new inspiration.”

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Stewart Should Learn from Jonathan Swift

Jon Stewart may be one of our leading satirists, but satire comes up short in handling this country’s healthcare crisis.

Posted in Swift (Jonathan) | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Morrison Helps Young Black Men Stand Tall

The story of how Toni Morrison’s “Song of Solomon” inspired one of my African American students.

Posted in Morrison (Toni) | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Using Lucille Clifton to Defend the Arts

There’s a decline in English majors at elite universities. We use a Lucille Clifton poem to respond.

Posted in Clifton (Lucille) | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Our Strands Grow Richer With Each Loss

May Sarton’s beautiful poem “All Souls” reminds us that our dead continue to move through us.

Posted in Sarton (May) | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Beards Win Big–Melville Would Approve

Herman Melville would have approved of the Boston Red Sox and the beards.

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Trippin’ Out and Dreamin’ of Utopia

This psychedelic Scott Bates poem, written in 1970, dreams of a better world.

Posted in Bates (Scott) | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

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