Category Archives: Atwood (Margaret)

Sustaining Narratives Can Become Traps

In Atwood’s “Life before Man,” a little girl turns to “The Wizard of Oz” to make sense of a chaotic life. Later in life, she learns that she must abandon this narrative that sustained her.

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Handmaid’s Tale, More Relevant Than Ever

With Hulu set to release “Handmaid’s Tale” tomorrow, I gather together all my past posts on Atwood’s dystopian classic. The novel isn’t only important for liberals but has lessons for rightwing women as well.

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Rakunks & Wolvogs & Pigoons, Oh My!

As gene splicing becomes more common, we need novels like Margaret Atwood’s “Oryx and Crake” to point out the dangers. By making connections, good dystopian fiction serves to wakes us up.

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Atwood Predicts the Fire Next Time

Atwood’s disturbing dystopian short story “Torch the Dusties” points to the uneven way that our society is apportioning its resources, along with the resulting anger.

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Fundamentalists Send Readers to Atwood

Margaret Atwood’s “Handmaid’s Tale” is topping bestseller lists at the moment. The reason is probably because of the GOP’s prospect of success in curbing reproductive freedom.

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Schlafly, Model for Atwood’s Serena Joy

Recently deceased Phyllis Schlafly served as the model for Serena Joy in Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel “Handmaid’s Tale.” Because Serena Joy gets the society she says she wants, however, her life turns bitter. Schlafly was lucky to live in a society that allowed women to have their own careers.

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Atwood’s Dystopias & the Gun Business

Margaret Atwood’s recent dystopian fictions capture how capitalism preys upon sex and fear. We don’t have to travel into the future as the gun industry is taking full advantage of our fears in the present.

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Misusing Metaphor in the Abortion Debates

Both sides are misusing metaphor in the abortion debates. If we want a deeper vision of reality, we must turn to literature.

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Atwood and a Woman on Death Row

Kelly Gissender, the Georgia woman scheduled to be executed, brings to mind Margaret Atwood’s meditations in “Alias Grace” on what goes on in a woman’s mind.

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Teaching Gender Sensitivity at West Point

Margaret Atwood’s “Handmaid’s Tale” is required reading for entering West Point cadets. Good things could happen.

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Atwood vs. Unregulated Capitalism

Atwood’s dystopian novel is about a future of unregulated high tech capitalism.

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Discovering the Bad Girl Within

My student’s project on literary bad girls looks at “Jane Eyre,” Toni Morrison’s “Sula,” and Margaret Atwood’s “Alias Grace.”

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Is Atwood’s Dystopia Coming True?

Atwood’s dystopian “Handmaid’s Tale” argues forcefully that women must maintain control over their own bodies.

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Is Atwood’s Dystopia Coming True?

With the rise in state legislatures passing anti-abortion legislation, Atwood’s “Handmaid’s Tale” seems more relevant than ever.

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Threatened by Female Empowerment

Atwood’s “Handmaid’s Tale” addresses issues raised by the Taliban shooting of a Pakistani school girl and also speaks to our abortion fights.

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Obama, Unconventional Epic Hero

Maybe Obama is like Beowulf, who watches out Grendel operates and allows the monster to strike first before responding. Then he reaches out with a firm grip. Bombast and theatrics are for others. His aim is to save the hall.

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Football’s Culture of Violence – A Response

Sports Saturday Discussion of violent football hits has dominated the sports airwaves ever since the nation witnessed a series of frightening high-impact collisions last weekend.  In apparent panic, the National Football League has been handing out large fines and threats of suspension to players, including a $75,000 fine to James Harrison of the Pittsburgh Steelers […]

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Internet Nastiness: Crying to Be Heard

There has been a lot of complaining in recent years about the lack of civility in social discourse.  The breakdown of common courtesy and mutual respect in town hall meetings, Congress, and other venues threatens (some believe) the very foundations of our society. In his article this week, Jason Blake talks about how the internet […]

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Atwood and the Eve of Destruction

Margaret Atwood’s most famous novel may be her futurist nightmare The Handmaid’s Tale (1985). In her two most recent novels, Atwood returns to the dystopian genre and paints a picture of a world in which unbridled capitalism, environmental devastation, urban decay, sexual license, runaway gene splicing, and extreme income disparity rule the earth. My book […]

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