Category Archives: Bronte (Charlotte)

#TrumpBookReports (in 140 characters)

For laughs, check out #TrumpBookReport on twitter. I’ve gathered some of the best renditions of Trump reviewing the classics.

Also posted in Bemelmans (Ludwig), Bronte (Emily), Carroll (Lewis), Cervantes (Miguel de), Dickens (Charles), Dostoevsky (Fyodor), Dr. Seuss, Hawthorne (Nathaniel), Hemingway (Ernest), Homer, Hugo (Victor), Lee (Harper), Lewis (C. S.), Melville (Herman), Milne (A. A.), Rowling (J. K.), Salinger (J. D.), Shakespeare (William), Silverstein (Shel), Steinbeck (John), Stowe (Harriet Beecher), Styron (William), Tolstoy (Leo) | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Mustering Courage To Become Jane Eyre

I’m convinced that “Jane Eyre” helped give my great-grandmother the courage to leave her home and launch herself into the world as a governess.

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Lily, Achilles, Bertha & Ishmael on Vacation

Lily Bart, Bertha Mason, Achilles, Ishmael and Queequeg all go on vacation. Where do they go?

Also posted in Homer, Melville (Herman) | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Child Heroines Who Die for Our Sins

The child heroine who dies, a common trope in the 19th century, continues to fascinate us, appearing in “Bridge to Tarabithia” and “The Fault Is in Our Stars.” One of my students has this as a senior project topic.

Also posted in Alcott (Louisa May), Dickens (Charles), Paterson (Katherine), Poe (Edgar Allan), Stowe (Harriet Beecher) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Jane Eyre: 1st Discipline, Then Love

To find love, Jane must first undergo a stern, self-denying discipline. Then she must let go of the discipline and follow her heart. She turns to a challenging passage from the Book of Mark to set off on that journey.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Herbert & Bronte on Spiritual Restlessness

St. Augustine, George Herbert, and Charlotte Bronte all write about spiritual restlessness.

Also posted in Augustine, Herbert (George) | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“Jane Eyre” Still Challenges Us

“Jane Eyre” was radical when it came out and it continues to challenge us today with its assertive women.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Social Media Invades the Classics

Imagining literary characters using social media opens up new insights into a work.

Also posted in Dickens (Charles), Mitchell (Margaret) | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sexual Misconduct in the Classics

A sexual misconduct course required of all employees got me thinking of problematic situations in the books that I teach.

Also posted in Austen (Jane), Behn (Aphra), Burney (Fanny), Euripides, Fielding (Henry), Montagu (Lady Mary Wortley), Sir Gawain Poet, Wilmot (John) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Austen, Moral Equivocation, and the NFL

My love of the NFL runs me up against some real moral quandaries. Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte would understand.

Also posted in Austen (Jane) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Books about People Reading Books

Books about books give readers a sense that they are part of a larger community.

Also posted in Austen (Jane), Dickens (Charles), Grahame (Kenneth), Milne (A. A.), Nesbitt (E.), Ransome (Arthur), Stevenson (Robert Louis), Twain (Mark) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Jane Eyre Is Not Twilight

“Jane Eyre” provides a lesson in how to emerge whole from a toxic relationship.

Also posted in Meyer (Stephenie) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Jane Eyre: Poverty Is No Crime

Unemployed Americans are much more like Jane Eyre than hammock-seeking wastrels.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

“Jane Eyre” as Lenten Meditation

In Jane’s battle with St. John Rivers, we have material that helps us understand the true meaning of Lent.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Think of Writing Essays as Method Acting

To teach writing about literature, think of your students as method actors.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Discovering the Bad Girl Within

My student’s project on literary bad girls looks at “Jane Eyre,” Toni Morrison’s “Sula,” and Margaret Atwood’s “Alias Grace.”

Also posted in Atwood (Margaret), Morrison (Toni), Stevenson (Robert Louis) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lit’s 10 Most Painful Marriage Proposals

Literature 10 most painful marriage proposals.

Also posted in Alcott (Louisa May), Austen (Jane), Chaucer (Geoffrey), Defoe (Daniel), Gay (John), Hardy (Thomas), Tolstoy (Leo), Wilde (Oscar) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Jane Eyre’s Critique of the 1%

The critique in “Jane Eyre” of privileged classes who attack the poor anticipates today’s political scene.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Lit’s 10 Strongest Female Characters

Who are literature’s ten strongest female characters? Here’s my list.

Also posted in Alcott (Louisa May), Austen (Jane), Chaucer (Geoffrey), Defoe (Daniel), Hawthorne (Nathaniel), Ibsen (Henrik), James (Henry), Shakespeare (William), Sophocles | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Kids Find Reading Tangible and Luscious

To teach kids to read by 3, use large flashcards with words that interest them.

Also posted in McCloskey (Robert) | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ashamed of Dark Fantasies? Turn to Lit

If we have dark fantasies that we are ashamed of, one response is to turn them into art.

Also posted in Sophocles | 1 Comment

Cinderella vs. Jane Eyre in Soccer Final

In tomorrow’s World Cup finals, Japan is Cinderella going up against America’s Jane Eyre.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

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