Category Archives: Sidney (Sir Philip)

Stephen Gosson: Unhinged by Lit

Stephen Gosson, a 17th century Puritan and failed playwright, unloads virtually every poet revered in the 17th century. Though we dismiss his words today, they anticipated contemporary attacks on literature/

Also posted in Gosson (Stephen) | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Workers of the World, Read! (Then Unite)

A “Washington Post” article argues that the arts are key in counteracting economic injustice. While this is true, the arts must be accompanied by smart politics to achieve this end.

Also posted in Fitzgerald (F. Scott), Wharton (Edith) | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Cosmic Theory of Literature

My attempt at an overarching theory of literature and its place in human history and human progress.

Also posted in Austen (Jane), Rand (Ayn), Shakespeare (William), Terence | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Can Lit Also Be a Force for Evil? A Debate

The classics are capable to doing great good but can they also do harm? Even as they powerfully open up the mind to new possibilities, can they also close it down? A debate.

Also posted in Aristotle, Austen (Jane), Plato, Shelley (Percy) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Poetry, the Road to Virtuous Action

Sir Philip Sidney believed that poetry was the most powerful means of leading us to virtuous action.

Also posted in Virgil | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

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