Tag Archives: climate change denialism

Climate Inaction Will Lead to a Dystopia

If we refuse to do anything to counteract climate change, we are doing grave injustice to our children and grandchildren. Russell Hoban’s post-apocalyptic fantasy “Riddley Walker” captures the selfishness that we would be guilty of.

Posted in Hoban (Russell) | Also tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tolstoy and Climate Change Denial

The denial of the citizens of Moscow as Napoleon approaches the city, described by Tolstoy in “War in Peace,” resembles climate change denialism.

Posted in Tolstoy (Leo) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Reflecting on “A Little Learning”

Pope’s “a little learning is a dangerous thing” applies to many of today’s policy debates.

Posted in Pope (Alexander) | Also tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

GOP Denies a Giant Problem

Faced with climate change denialism, Obama has been forced to take executive action. Jonathan Swift would understand.

Posted in Swift (Jonathan) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Melville and Climate Change Denial

Melville’s “Benito Cereno” perfectly captures Rightwing denial of climate change.

Posted in Melville (Herman) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Out of Denialism and into Responsibility

Denialism such as we are seeing with regard to climate change is well describe in “All the King’s Men.”

Posted in Warren (Robert Penn) | Also tagged , , | 5 Comments

Haiyan, Climate Change Denial, & Lear

“King Lear” gives us language to describe Typhoon Haiyan and also a framework to understand climate change denialism.

Posted in Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

  • AVAILABLE NOW!

  • Literature is as vital to our lives as food and shelter. Stories and poems help us work through the challenges we face, from everyday irritations to loneliness, heartache, and death. Literature is meant to mix it up with life. This website explores how it does so.

    Please feel free to e-mail me [rrbates (at) smcm (dot) edu]. I would be honored to hear your thoughts and questions about literature.

  • Sign up for weekly newsletter

    Your email will not be shared or sold.
    * = required field

    powered by MailChimp!
  • Twitter Authentication data is incomplete