Tag Archives: Easter

Only after Pain Comes Life

For Mother’s Day, here’s a Madeleine L’Engle poem about Jesus’s mother experiencing the crucifixion and then the resurrection. In it we see both the joys and the heartbreak that come with an unconditional mother’s love.

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Absent from This World, Alive in Another

As is traditional with this blog, we share a Mary Oliver poem about a magical encounter with a deer–which recalls Mary Magdalene’s magical encounter with Jesus in the garden.

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A White Cross Streaming across the Sky

Today’s Easter poem is Mary Oliver’s “The Swan,” in which everything suddenly becomes clear.

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Out of the Blackness Every Morning

Many of Mary Oliver’s poems, including “The Sun,” function well as Easter poems.

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Replacing the Temple with the Torah

Nicole Krauss’s marvelous novel “Great House” finds hope in the Torah, which takes many forms.

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the dance of Jesus music holds the air

These Lucille Clifton poems usher us from Lent into Easter.

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Here Is No Water but Only Rock

Dry rocks have functioned as images of spiritual desolation throughout the history of Good Friday poetry.

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Yielding the Heart to an Easter Lily

Claude McKay poem about an Easter lily is a sensuous immersion.

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A Breathing Palace of Leaves

Many of Mary Oliver’s nature poems enact a version of the crucifixion and resurrection.

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Far Off the Bells Rang through the Morning

Mary Oliver finds Easter holiness in a new born fawn.

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Dear Son, Far Off, My Lost Desire

I understand more with each passing year what Tennyson means when he says his love “is vaster passion now” and how Hallam is thoroughly mixed with God and nature. Tennyson goes on to say that the moral will of humankind—the “living will” that is the best part of ourselves as a people—can finding footing on this spiritual rock. And that the living water that springs from this rock will “flow through our deeds and make them pure.”

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Rise, Heart, Thy Lord Is Risen

I write this the night before our sunrise Easter service where, as members of our church choir, Julia and I will arise before dawn to sing in the rising of the sun/son. No matter how early we get up, George Herbert’s “Easter” reassures us, the Lord is always there before us

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Butterfly Wings, Easter Transformation

Spiritual Sunday In the Episcopal church we are still in the season of Easter, which is coinciding this year with a particularly beautiful spring.  I’ve therefore chosen another Easter poem for “Spiritual Sunday.” This is an emblem poem by my favorite religious poet, George Herbert.  It is entitled “Easter Wings”: Lord, Who createdst man in […]

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God Send Easter–and Hats

Spiritual Sunday/ Easter With this post I am beginning a new series, to appear each Sunday, on literature and spirituality.  There is much great literature that speaks directly to religious and spiritual matters, and this gives me an extra opportunity to share some fine poems.  At present I am anticipating that these posts will involve […]

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