Tag Archives: fathers and sons

Loud Sneezes, a Sign from the Gods

My loud sneezes, according to Homer, as a sign from the gods.

Posted in Homer | Also tagged , , | Leave a comment

Remembering a Father’s Tenderness

In this poem about his father, Li-Young Lee remembers a tender moment that has led to his own tenderness as an adult.

Posted in Lee (Li-Young) | Also tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Great Political Novels Not Agenda Driven

Great political novels are rich in spiritual attitude. Poor ones are agenda driven.

Posted in Conrad (Joseph), Dostoevsky (Fyodor), Ginzburg (Natalia), Gordimer (Nadine), James (Henry), Llosa (Vargas), Naipaul (V.S.), Pamuk (Orhan), Roth (Philip K.), Stendahl, Turgenev (Ivan), Yeats (William Butler) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Sons Must Kill Their Fathers, Alas

There’s is no easy way for son’s to find their identities apart from their fathers, but they have no choice but to try.

Posted in Diderot (Denis), Homer, Shakespeare (William), Stendahl | Also tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Greatest Generation’s Citizen Kane

Charlie Kane sold to a bank  Film Friday Several weeks ago I wrote about the impact that the movie Citizen Kane had on my father in the months before he was drafted into the army in 1942. I was so fascinated by his response that I collaborated with him on an article about what Citizen […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

My Three Sons and the Mystic Power of 3

  Yesterday I was talking to my wife about our children—who, at 27 and 25, I admit are no longer children.  Being the proud parents that we are, we were noting with wonder how they are identifying their gifts, building upon their strengths, and developing into fully self-actualized human beings.  As we talked, however, we […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

On Literary Names and Destinies

Reynold, “Portrait of Sterne”                                   Just as I was born into a literary name, so were Darien and Toby.  Before telling the story, I will follow up on the allusion in my last post to Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

On Being Named after Christopher Robin

  As I have been writing about fathers and sons in the past few posts, I shift today from my position of father to that of son and to the literary origins of my name.   My father named me after Christopher Robin and recently told me that he envisioned having the kind of relationship with […]

Posted in Milne (A. A.), Uncategorized | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

Father-Son Conflict: The Comic Version

  In yesterday’s post I began giving an account of a car conversation I had with my two sons regarding stories that explore father-son relationships, as well as my desire for a story in which fathers and sons collaborate to handle the world’s challenges.  Darien, my older son, felt that the archetypal conflict as it […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

Is Father-Son Conflict Inevitable?

I had an interesting conversation with my two sons yesterday as we drove them and my daughter-in-law to the Portland airport, marking the beginning of the end of our summer vacation.  The conversation began with me wondering why there weren’t works of literature that accurately capture the kind of father-son relationship that I feel that […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

  • AVAILABLE NOW!

  • Literature is as vital to our lives as food and shelter. Stories and poems help us work through the challenges we face, from everyday irritations to loneliness, heartache, and death. Literature is meant to mix it up with life. This website explores how it does so.

    Please feel free to e-mail me [rrbates (at) smcm (dot) edu]. I would be honored to hear your thoughts and questions about literature.

  • Sign up for weekly newsletter

    Your email will not be shared or sold.
    * = required field

    powered by MailChimp!
  • Twitter Authentication data is incomplete