Tag Archives: Freedom

Poetry & the Sea Liberate the Imprisoned

For Pablo Neruda’s, the “poet’s obligation” is to speak for freedom–which makes poetry vital important in our time.

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Is Freedom More Powerful than Fear?

Obama in his Oval Office speech on terrorism said that “freedom is more powerful than fear.” Dostoevsky’s Grand Inquisitor would beg to differ.

Posted in Auden (W. H.) | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Jordan River Continues to Inspire

The River Jordan, an inspiring image for American slaves, has worked it was into contemporary African American poems, including those of Lucille Clifton.

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Two Parables Involving Falling Leaves

Scott Bates and Lucille Clifton find poetic lessons in falling leaves.

Posted in Bates (Scott), Clifton (Lucille) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

More Frightening than Arrest, Freedom

Levertov’s poem about Peter escaping prison confronts existential issues of freedom

Posted in Levertov (Denise) | Also tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The President Is Reading Novels? Good!

Rightwing attacks on Obama for including novels in his summer reading are all wrong. We want our presidents to be balanced and grounded, and good fiction helps one remember what is really important in life.

Posted in Franzen (Jonathan), Huxley (Aldous), Verghese (Abraham) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Freedom (a.k.a. Irresponsibility)

Jonathan’s Franzen’s “Freedom” is written in the John Cheever-John Updike-Tom Wolfe-Don DeLillo tradition, an up-close look at American middle class culture. But it leaves out some of the heroic struggles that are going on.

Posted in Franzen (Jonathan) | Also tagged , , , | 4 Comments

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