Tag Archives: Henry IV Part I

Can Trump Cast Off His Falstaffs?

Can Donald Trump, like Prince Hal in Shakespeare’s “Henry IV” plays, shift from irresponsible merrymaker to great leader? Can he say, “I know thee not old man” to his former companions? Dream on.

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Kill All the Lawyers? Nope, We Need Them

A district judge reflects upon what lawyers and judges can learn from Shakespeare, including “Othello,” “Merchant of Venice, “Hamlet,” “King Lear,” most of the history plays, and others.

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Prince Hal in Today’s School System

David Brooks argues that today’s “nurturing, collaborative” educational system would have kept Shakespeare’s Prince Hal from becoming one of England’s great kings.

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The Bard: Sublime Poet, Ace Businessman

My son Darien and I were interviewed by Boomer Alley Radio yesterday—I’ve posted the listening times below in case any of you live out west or want to check out the podcast—and while I wish I’d gotten a bit more specific about how Shakespeare applies to business, it was fun. Everything I said on the […]

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Rex Ryan, a Modern Day Falstaff

Sports Saturday As we move towards the NFL’s conference championships, one of the most interesting stories continues to be loud-mouthed Rex Ryan, the 350-pound coach of the New York Jets. If his team were to win its third straight road game tomorrow, it would be, in the words of Sport Illustrated’s Rick Reilly, the “greatest […]

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