Tag Archives: Jesus

Curling Up with a Good Book

This Scott Bates is a testimony to the solitary joy of reading.

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Emily Dickinson’s “Smart Misery” of Doubt

Emily Dickinson struggled with religious doubt all of her life. Because she desperately wanted to belief, some of her poems show her faith being tested.

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Stop and Smell Mary’s Perfume

The scene in John where Mary anoints Jesus’s feet with a costly perfume, Judas, who chastises her for wastefulness, reminds me of those earnest activists who can’t stop and smell the perfume. D. H. Lawrence explores a similar theme in “The Man Who Died.”

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What in Me Is Dark Illumine

An epiphany is the moment when something divine enters the human realm. During the Epiphany season, Christians celebrate such moments. In the famous opening of “Paradise Lost,” Milton notes that the Holy Spirit is his muse and connects his own inspiration with a number of famous visitations of the Holy Spirit throughout Biblical history.

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A Guest Worthy To Be Here

Jesus learned to accept a Canaanite woman at his table and George Herbert learns that he belongs at that table. We can use them as models as we face refugees and immigrants.

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Look Down on Us Who Journey by Night

Alfred Noyes’s “Night Journey” looks to God to find hope in the night.

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“Is My Son Mad?” Mary Asks

In Thomas Hardy’s version of Mary, she’s a mother wondering whether her son is mad.

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Something Different Crosses the Threshold

Mary Oliver gives a powerful reading of Jesus calming the storm.

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Who Is the Third Always Beside You?

Eliot’s reference to the Road to Emmaus story in “The Wasteland” may be sign of hope rather than despair.

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Tormented, Torn & Twisted with Doubt

In Levertov’s poem on St. Thomas, she links his doubts with that of the father of the demon-possessed son who comes to Jesus.

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Chaucer’s Riff on the Woman at the Well

Seen in the light of the Samaritan woman at the well, Chaucer’s Wife of Bath is one of Christ’s messengers.

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Who Has Seen the Wind?

Christina Rossetti’s “Who Has Seen the Wind?” is about the Holy Spirit.

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To the Pure All Things Are Pure

Edwin Muir’s beautiful poem about the transfiguration points the way to pure seeing for all of us.

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i put him all into my arms

e. e. cummings’ “man who had fallen among thieves” brings the Good Samaritan parable uncomfortably close to home.

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Bread, the Universal Language

Poet Linda Pastan, like Jesus, sees in bread a metaphor for spiritual transcendence.

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Christ’s Love for Hot Barley Bread

Chaucer’s Wife of Bath may not be pure, but Jesus would appreciate her great heart.

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Father, Son, Holy Spirit – A Story for Each

Can different members of the Holy Trinity be seen to shape different narratives?

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Jesus’s Momentary Desire to Step Back

Levertov focuses on Jesus’s very human moments of doubt, which serve to emphasize the sublimity of his acceptance of his humiliation and death.

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Plucking Out the Fangs of Hate

Gibran’s version of Jesus driving the moneychangers from the temple wonders how he pulled it off.

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Religion and Self Love

In “Gospel Song,” Scott Bates sees self-interest entering into the motivations of even the holiest of men—King David, Daniel, Jesus and Moses.

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And a woman said, “Tell us of Pain”

Here’s a poem that deals directly with pain, from Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet.  I don’t entirely understand it but I’m intrigued by some of its claims: “And a woman spoke, saying, “Tell us of Pain.” And he said: Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses your understanding. Even as the stone of […]

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