Tag Archives: libraries

A World of Books amid a World of Green

Treat yourself to two delightful poems about books and gardens by the Victorian/Edwardian poet Richard Le Gallienne.

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A Poem in Praise of Libraries

In his new collection of poems, Norman Finkelstein has one of the best poems I have encountered about libraries. The poem captures the paradoxical nature of libraries, how they both preserve the past but look forward to the future.

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Listen Carefully–The Books Are Whispering

I gave a talk last night to Leonardtown, Maryland’s Friends of the Library about—surprise!–“How Literature Can Change Your Life.” It was a busy day, what with writing the talk and turning in final grades and going to one last committee meeting and attending a retirement party (for which I wrote a bit of doggerel) and […]

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The Liberating Power of Yo-Yos

In this Scott Bates fantasy, a renegade scholar breaks library protocol with a bright red yo-yo.

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Fight the Power, Check Out a Book

Alberto Manguel’s The Library at Night is an unusual combination of fact and reflection, probing the nature and meaning of libraries.

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Our Inner Library: A Quiz

Last semester my Ljubljana friend Jason Blake sent me a passage from Alberto Manguel’s novel The Library at Night. A colleague of Jason’s was trying to identify all the literary allusions and was stuck on “first centenary encounter with ice.” It took me a while but I think I was able to identify it correctly, […]

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