Tag Archives: Marcel Proust

When It Comes to Culture, Bet on France

In the wake of the ISIS attacks, France has something to fall back on: its proud literary tradition.

Posted in Apollinaire (Guillaume), Camus (Albert), Hugo (Victor), Jarry (Alfred), Proust (Marcel), Sartre (Jean Paul) | Also tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Portrait of the Lesbian as a Young Artist

Proust and James Joyce were particularly important in helping Alison Bechdel negotiate her complex relations with her father.

Posted in Bechdel (Alison), Colette, Dahl (Roald), Joyce (James), Milne (A. A.), Proust (Marcel), Salinger (J. D.), Wilde (Oscar) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

10 Famous Fetish Objects in Lit

Literature is filled with fetish objects that take on outsized significance to various characters.

Posted in Dickens (Charles), Fielding (Henry), Poe (Edgar Allan), Pope (Alexander), Proust (Marcel), Rushdie (Salman), Shakespeare (William), Sir Gawain Poet, Wycherley (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Judge’s Love Affair with Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust has made Stephen Breyer a better Supreme Court justice.

Posted in Proust (Marcel) | Also tagged , , , | 1 Comment

The Brave New World of Twitterature

Depending on your point of view, literature reduced to tweets is either comic or horrifying.

Posted in Austen (Jane), Flaubert (Gustave), Forster (E.M.), Kafka (Franz), Milton (John), Proust (Marcel), Salinger (J. D.), Steinbeck (John) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Literary Salons with One Who Is Dying

I have written about my close friend and colleague Alan Paskow, whose lungs (although he does not smoke) have been attacked by an aggressive cancer.  One response of the community has been to gather for literary salons every two or three weeks.  Anywhere from 15-20 people attend each one, despite busy schedules.  In attendance are […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , , | Comments closed

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