Tag Archives: Native Son

Black vs. White Responses to “Raisin”

“Raisin in the Sun” was a hit with both white and black audiences when it appeared in 1959 but for very different reasons.

Posted in Hansberry (Lorraine) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bigger Thomas, Clarence’s Shadow

“Native Son,” 75 years old, is Justice Clarence Thomas’ favorite novel. I theorize that Bigger Thomas is the justice’s destructive shadow.

Posted in Baldwin (James), Wright (Richard) | Also tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Uncomfortable Books that Help Us Grow

Streep and Kline in Sophie’s Choice  A recent survey of the Tea Party movement has revealed that the movement is overwhelmingly white, educated, middle class and conservative, and people are now studying what it all means.  I love this post Ta-Tehisi Coates, a senior editor for The Atlantic. As occurs in the world of the […]

Posted in Bronte (Emily), Roth (Philip K.), Roy (Arundhati), Styron (William), Wright (Richard) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Clarence Thomas and Native Son

The focus in this week’s posts is on Supreme Court justices and literature. I notice that, in his New York Times column today, moderate conservative David Brooks endorses Sonia Sotomayor for just that restrained balance that we discussed yesterday as we explored her early love for Nancy Drew novels. Today I’m going to talk about […]

Posted in Rand (Ayn), Wright (Richard) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Sonia Sotomayor and Nancy Drew

This week, with Sonia Sotomayor still in the news (although the firestorm that greeted her nomination has gone into temporary remission), I thought I’d devote my posts to supreme court justices and literature. This was inspired in part by an excellent New York Times article over the weekend on Sotomayor and Clarence Thomas (in which […]

Posted in Asimov (Isaac), Delaney (Samuel), Dixon (Franklin), Keene (Carolyn), Stratemeyer (Edward) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed


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