Tag Archives: Othello

A Literary History of the Insult “Cuck”

“Cuck” has become a favorite insult amongst alt-right types. In today’s post I trace literary references to cuckolds going back to Chaucer.

Posted in Chaucer (Geoffrey), Marlowe (Christopher), Shakespeare (William), Wycherley (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In Defense of The Merchant of Venice

Percy Shelley believes that great art transcends the prejudices of its time, even when it is cloaked in them. If he is right, then “Merchant of Venice” is less of a problem play than many people consider it.

Posted in Shakespeare (William), Shelley (Percy) | Also tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Kill All the Lawyers? Nope, We Need Them

A district judge reflects upon what lawyers and judges can learn from Shakespeare, including “Othello,” “Merchant of Venice, “Hamlet,” “King Lear,” most of the history plays, and others.

Posted in Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Complex Inner Life of Teachers

Lily King’s “The English Teacher” is filled with literary lllusions, most of them thematically important.

Posted in Beowulf Poet, Eliot (T.S.), Faulkner (William), Hardy (Thomas), Homer, Joyce (James), King (Lily), Poe (Edgar Allan), Twain (Mark) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Robert Durst’s Iago-Like Soliloquy

How to interpret suspected murderer Robert Durst’s enigmatic words on “The Jinx”? Shakespeare’s villains point the way.

Posted in Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Bard Could Improve Lawyer Behavior

A judge makes his case about how Shakespeare can improve lawyer professionalism.

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Debating Whether Lit Is Useless

I take issue with a “New Yorker” blog on whether or not literature can be considered “useful.”

Posted in Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , | 1 Comment

Petraeus: Karenina, Oedipus, or Antony?

The David Petraeus affair–is it 19th century melodrama or high tragedy?

Posted in Hugo (Victor), Shakespeare (William), Sophocles, Tolstoy (Leo) | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reading for Fun, the Best Education

In “Northanger Abbey,” Jane Austen advocates the ideal way to raise one’s kids: encourage them to read good literature and they will learn the life lessons that they need.

Posted in Austen (Jane), Carroll (Lewis), Gay (John), Gray (Thomas), Pope (Alexander), Shakespeare (William), Thompson (James) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Which Shakespearean Hero Is Murdoch?

So which Shakespeare hero is Rupert Murdoch? Marche floats the names of Macbeth, Hamlet, Lear, Richard II and Richard III. I’d peg him as Iago.

Posted in Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

After the Mess, Can Obama Be Fortinbras?

I’ve been thinking recently about how every Shakespearean tragedy concludes with a restoration of order.  The stage may be strewn with corpses and the spectator’s heart may have broken into a thousand little pieces, but (as though to provide some reassurance) someone steps forward at the end to set things straight. In Hamlet it is […]

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