Tag Archives: snow

Blizzard Jonas: How the Wind Doth Ramm!

In “Ancient Music” Ezra Pound voices what all those who were hit hard by the weekend’s Jonas Blizzard were thinking–and often saying.

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The Frolic Architecture of the Snow

Ralph Waldo Emerson sees a snow-storm as a master architect and “fierce artificer.”

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Why the Wealthy Get Wealthier

Thomas Piketty turns to Jane Austen and Honoré de Balzac to analyze “Capitalism in the 21st Century.”

Posted in Austen (Jane), Balzac (Honoré de), James (Henry), Pamuk (Orhan) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Captain Nemo Invades New England

Snowstorm Nemo set in conjunction with Joyce’s “The Dead” leads to some interesting reflections.

Posted in Frost (Robert), Joyce (James) | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

First Snowfall, A Moment of Grace

For Mary Oliver, the season’s first snow fall raises existential questions and then answers them in its own way.

Posted in Oliver (Mary) | Also tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Great Political Novels Not Agenda Driven

Great political novels are rich in spiritual attitude. Poor ones are agenda driven.

Posted in Conrad (Joseph), Dostoevsky (Fyodor), Ginzburg (Natalia), Gordimer (Nadine), James (Henry), Llosa (Vargas), Naipaul (V.S.), Pamuk (Orhan), Roth (Philip K.), Stendahl, Turgenev (Ivan), Yeats (William Butler) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Praise the Wet Snow

In her poem about a gray October day, Denise Levertov senses “the invisible sun burning beyond.”

Posted in Levertov (Denise) | Also tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Velvet Shoes, Walking in Snow

“We shall walk in velvet shoes,” writes poet Elinor Wylie, describing the experience of walking in snow.

Posted in Wylie (Elinor) | Also tagged , , | 3 Comments

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