Tag Archives: Syria

On Broken Ceasefires, in Homer & in Syria

The horrific bombing of a 31-truck aid convoy brought an end to the painstakingly negotiated ceasefire between Russian and the United States in Syria. The incident resembled how Hera and Athena break up the truce that the Greeks and Trojans are trying to negotiate in “The Iliad.”

Posted in Homer | Also tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Speak Now for Peace

Obama, take note: Vachel Lindsay in 1915 counseled against going to war even after the sinking of the Lusitania.

Posted in Lindsay (Vachel), Tolstoy (Leo) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Getting Tied Down in Syria

Is there a danger that U.S. involvement in Syria will lead to a Gulliver-like disaster?

Posted in Swift (Jonathan) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Syrian Violence vs. Our Humanity

Galloway’s “Cellist of Sarajevo” gives a face to the victims of violence.

Posted in Galloway (Steven) | Also tagged , , | 1 Comment

Syria’s Massacre of the Innocents

Updating Herod’s slaughter of the innocents, Scott Bates imagines a soldier who takes a principled stand and refuses to participate.

Posted in Bates (Scott) | Also tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Assad Came Down Like a Wolf on the Fold

The Syrian president’s assault on his people reminds me of Lord Bryon’s poem “The Destruction of Sennacherib,” where a superior force is defeated by the cause of justice. Time will tell whether this is no more than a fantasy.

Posted in Byron (Lord Gordon) | Also tagged , , , | Comments closed

Refugees Dropped in a Fantastic Terrain

As I watch the brutal repression currently underway in Syria, I am reminded of Syrian-American poet Mohja Kahf’s poem about her family fleeing to America from Assad’s father in 1971.

Posted in Kahf (Mohja) | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

  • AVAILABLE NOW!

  • Literature is as vital to our lives as food and shelter. Stories and poems help us work through the challenges we face, from everyday irritations to loneliness, heartache, and death. Literature is meant to mix it up with life. This website explores how it does so.

    Please feel free to e-mail me [rrbates (at) smcm (dot) edu]. I would be honored to hear your thoughts and questions about literature.

  • Sign up for weekly newsletter

    Your email will not be shared or sold.
    * = required field

    powered by MailChimp!
  • Twitter Authentication data is incomplete