Tag Archives: Tintern Abbey

Wordsworth and a Depressed Philosopher

When utilitarian John Stuart Mill’s philosophy led him into despair, Wordsworth’s poetry saved him.

Posted in Blake (William), Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Transfiguration: I Saw a Tree inside a Tree

Here’s a Christian Wiman poem for Transfiguration Poem that gets at those moments when the veil is momentarily lifted and we see into the life of things.

Posted in Wiman (Christian) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Commencement à la Wordsworth

Tomorrow our students graduate and they will sing a school song that draws heavily on Wordsworth. The song also has an unexpected twist not intended by the author that always gets a laugh.

Posted in Cognard-Black (Jennifer), Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Reconnecting with My Dead Son

Thursday I had a shock of recognition while teaching Stephen King’s IT in my American Fantasy class yesterday. The approach to life that saves the day for the protagonist is the approach that got my eldest son killed 16 years ago. Yet I don’t think King is wrong. In fact, I was comforted once I saw the […]

Posted in King (Stephen), Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Mental Benefits of Forest Walking

Recent brain research notes that walking amongst trees is a powerful antidote to depression. Wordsworth knew this long ago.

Posted in Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

All Which We Behold Is Full of Blessings

Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey” provides us with passage that functions as a Thanksgiving poem.

Posted in Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , | 2 Comments

The Moment Kindheartedness Walks In

Sometimes when I get depressed about the state of the world, I do two things. First, I remind myself that too often I allow myself to be stampeded into fear by media headlines, which use adrenaline to hook us. Second, I recollect the many generous and kind people in my life and in the world. […]

Posted in Komunyakaa (Yusef), Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , | Comments closed

With Aging, Abundant Recompense

  In a follow-up to yesterday’s post where I talked about my cancer-ridden friend Alan, I examine another passage from The Brothers Karamazov. This one is focused on aging generally, not just death. If you ever find yourself getting depressed about getting old, check it out.   And check out as well William Wordsworth’s Intimations […]

Posted in Dostoevsky (Fyodor), Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

The Cataract Haunted Me Like a Passion

Ansel Adams, Yosemite Falls          Julia, Toby (our youngest son) and I visited Yosemite National Park for the first time last week, and I am still vibrating from the stunning rock faces and gorgeous waterfalls.  It was remarkable to see what seemed, at a distance, to be thin, almost delicate, streams of water pouring from great […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

The Restorative Power of Daffodils

Daffodils have been breaking out all over.  St. Mary’s City has a little ravine that we refer to as “Daffodil Gulch,” and the flowers this year have been spectacular.  Daffodil Gulch borders St. Mary’s River, and if one visits it on a sunny day and then looks beyond to the sparkling waters, one cannot help […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Also tagged , , , | Comments closed

  • AVAILABLE NOW!

  • Literature is as vital to our lives as food and shelter. Stories and poems help us work through the challenges we face, from everyday irritations to loneliness, heartache, and death. Literature is meant to mix it up with life. This website explores how it does so.

    Please feel free to e-mail me [rrbates (at) smcm (dot) edu]. I would be honored to hear your thoughts and questions about literature.

  • Sign up for weekly newsletter

    Your email will not be shared or sold.
    * = required field

    powered by MailChimp!
  • Twitter Authentication data is incomplete