Tag Archives: Wilfred Owen

Memorial Day: Anthem for Doomed Youth

With Memorial Day, there is the danger that we will romanticize the deaths of the fallen rather than face up to the full tragedy. This tension can be seen in a number of World War I poems, some of which romanticize the fallen while others dwell on the absurdity of their deaths.

Posted in Binyon (Laurence), Brooke (Rupert), Owen (Wilfred), Seeger (Alan) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Soldier, Rest, Thy Warfare O’er

In “Soldier Rest,” Sir Walter Scott captures how inviting death can look to those caught up in battle’s throes.

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Whitman’s Poem a Lesson for War Hawks

In “The Wound-Binder,” Walt Whitman refuses to glorify war and only shows its bloody aftermath–a good thing to remember on the 150th anniversary of the Civil War’s final day.

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Would I Were in Grantchester

The BBC series “Grantchester” owes its inspiration to a Rupert Brooke poem.

Posted in Brooke (Rupert), Owen (Wilfred) | Also tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

The Fellowship of Soldiers

In a poem for Veterans Day, Wilfred Owen captures the heartfelt emotions and the bonding that soldiers experience. Some of these emotions are genuinely moving, others are disturbing.

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Poetry Changed during World War I

The horrors of World War I created some great poetry. But not in its early days.

Posted in Brooke (Rupert), Freeman (John), Owen (Wilfred), Seeger (Alan) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

He Sleeps Less Cold Than We Who Wake

Wilfred Owen’s “Asleep” looks with sorrow at the death of a comrade.

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Hagel: “No Glory, Only Suffering in War”

Some of Chuck Hagel’s statements about war are reminiscent of the anti-war poetry of Wilfred Owen.

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Lamentation and Weeping in Newtown

The Sandy Hook killings recall the Biblical massacre of the innocents, referenced in “Moby Dick.”

Posted in Bible, Melville (Herman), Owen (Wilfred) | Also tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

Sacrifice Ram of Pride, Not Isaac

Rumi honors the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Adha, which centers on the story of Abraham and Isaac.

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Memorializing Our Lost Innocence

Wilfred Owen’s “Strange Meeting” is not only about the soldiers who have died but how their death taints the living.

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Weep, For You May Touch Them Not

In his poem “Greater Love,” Owen describes two deaths. One is the physical death of soldiers, which is tragic enough. But the other death is also heartbreaking: the death of innocence that occurs when people become intimately acquainted with war.

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Christopher Hitchens, Literary Bully

I confess to bristling when I hear the name Christopher Hitchens.The intellectual provocateur has been in the news recently, first for publishing his memoirs and second for contracting throat cancer.Although he is smart and well read, he has always struck me as a self-righteous intellectual bully, one who is more interested in toppling icons than […]

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Telling the Truth about War

As the president addressed the nation Tuesday night about his decision to send more troops to Afghanistan, I found myself impressed with his seriousness and depressed over the situation. I know that he has no good options.  I can’t tell whether his decision is the right one. Literature, as I’ve periodically noted on this blog, […]

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