Category Archives: Bronte (Charlotte)

Is Sexist Lit Gaslighting Women?

A Guardian article argues that critical praise for sexist male authors valorizes patriarchal attitudes.

Also posted in Nabokov (Vladimir), Roth (Philip K.) | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Literature’s Revolutionary Power

The concept of “unleashing,” used to explain much of today’s upheaval, can also be applied to literature that changes lives.

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Jane Eyre on Caring for the Sick

As I support people who are sick and aging, I turn to Jane Eyre as a model of one who considers such activity to be, not a self-sacrifice, but a gift to herself.

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Trapped in the Marriage Plot?

Are even great novels like “Emma,” “Pride and Prejudice,” “Jane Eyre,” and “Middlemarch” complicit with patriarchy? Some feminists argue that this is in fact the case.

Also posted in Austen (Jane) | Leave a comment

Jane Eyre, Still Groundbreaking

In her senior project, one of my students looked at four film adaptations of “Jane Eyre” and concluded that Bronte’s novel is more radical than all but one of them.

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#TrumpBookReports (in 140 characters)

For laughs, check out #TrumpBookReport on twitter. I’ve gathered some of the best renditions of Trump reviewing the classics.

Also posted in Bemelmans (Ludwig), Bronte (Emily), Carroll (Lewis), Cervantes (Miguel de), Dickens (Charles), Dostoevsky (Fyodor), Dr. Seuss, Hawthorne (Nathaniel), Hemingway (Ernest), Homer, Hugo (Victor), Lee (Harper), Lewis (C. S.), Melville (Herman), Milne (A. A.), Rowling (J. K.), Salinger (J. D.), Shakespeare (William), Silverstein (Shel), Steinbeck (John), Stowe (Harriet Beecher), Styron (William), Tolstoy (Leo) | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

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