Tag Archives: T. S. Eliot

Come, Holy Spirit

Pentecost Sunday Nobel Prize-winning Polish poet Czeslaw Milosz uses the occasion of Pentecost to explore the nature of faith in his poem “Veni Creator.” Although the apostles may have been filled with the Holy Spirit, what about those of us who don’t experience tongues of flame? Here’s Luke’s description of moment (Acts 2:1-4): When the […]

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Lent: The Air Heavy and Thick

Spiritual Sunday I share today a good Lenten poem by Denise Levertov where the poet finds herself in a funk, albeit not a dramatic funk. She’s experiencing neither a “dark night of the soul” nor a scorching wasteland desert, those extreme moments of crisis that have pushed people to revelation. (Today’s Gospel reading is Jesus’s […]

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Sen. Flake Is No Hamlet

Comparisons of Sen. Flake to Hamlet over the Brett Kavanaugh is an insult to Hamlet.

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Live in the Layers, Not on the Litter

Stanley Kunitz writes a variation of Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” that beautifully captures Yom Kippur themes.

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Will Hollow Senators Stand Up to Trump?

If pro-choice Senate Republicans are like the hollow people described by Dante and T. S. Eliot, we can’t expect them to vote down an anti-abortion Supreme Court justice.

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The Bloody Flesh Our Only Food

I share a Good Friday poem by T. S. Eliot and a Passover poem by Norman Finkelstein.

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Lit Frees Us from Our Mental Ghettos

In a fine “New Yorker” article, Shakespearean Stephen Greenblatt argues that Shakespeare was incapable to showing anything less than the full humanity of his characters, even the villains. He thereby liberates us from our “mental ghettos.”

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Will No One Rid Me of This Russia Probe?

When former FBI Director James Comey, in his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, quoted Henry II–“Will no one rid me of this meddlesome priest”–he brought to mind both T.S. Eliot’s “Murder in the Cathedral” and Shakespeare’s “Richard II.” He took the right lessons from history by not murdering the Russia investigation.

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T. S. Eliot, Hope for the Suicidal

In a guest post, novelist Lauren B. Davis draws on Eliot’s “Waste Land” and “Four Quartets” to deal with the suicides of her two brothers and find a way forward.

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