Monthly Archives: April 2015

Mourning Lincoln, Mourning My Son

Whitman’s mourning of Lincoln in “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” also captures what it feels like to lose a child.

Posted in Whitman (Walt) | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Protesting Baltimore’s Racial Divide

The racial divide we are currently seeing in Baltimore was noted by Countee Cullen in 1925.

Posted in Cullen (Countee) | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

In April, Frogs Shout Their Desire

In this Mary Oliver poem, frogs shout their desire and people aren’t far behind.

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The Journey of the Reader Hero

Reading literature can be compared to Joseph Campbell’s “Journey of the Hero.”

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The God of Love My Shepherd Is

George Herbert rewrites the 23rd psalm in subtle ways, turning the Lord in the “God of Love” and filling the cup with the eucharist.

Posted in Herbert (George) | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

The Making of a Literary Meal

A new anthology of “foodie lit” has recipes accompanying the poems, essays, and short stories.

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Hillary Will Be Cast as a Witch

Prepare to see Hillary Clinton cast by the GOP in the role of the Wicked Witch of the West

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Earth Day: Please Brake for Woolly Bears

Scott Bates’ Earth Day poem calls for protecting even caterpillars. After all, sometimes they grow up to be Keats’ tiger moths with their “deep damasked wings.”

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A Fatal Diagnosis, an Almost Ghost

A good friend has just been diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer, putting me in mind of a poem by Lucille Clifton when she learned of her husband’s lung cancer diagnosis.

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