Tag Archives: Aging

Is Old Age Becoming Overrated?

A “New Yorker” article on aging turns to literature to debunk the notion that aging is a good thing.

Posted in Aristotle, Bogan (Louise), Chaucer (Geoffrey), Johnson (Samuel), Plato, Shakespeare (William), Swift (Jonathan), Tennyson (Alfred Lord), Whitman (Walt), Yeats (William Butler) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mrs. Dalloway and the Gift of Aging

Friday My wife Julia alerted me to a luminescent Atlantic article about women disappearing as they grow older. Although some regard this as a problem, author Akiko Busch draws on Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway to show how women can turn it to their advantage. First, the apparent problem. When women are treated as objects, they […]

Posted in Le Guin (Ursula K), Woolf (Virginia) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

In Honor of a Nonagenarian

My mother turned 93 yesterday so I share this moving R. S. Thomas poem on visiting a woman turning 90.

Posted in Thomas (R. S.) | Also tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Dreamlike Pleasures of Rowing

In “Alice through the Looking Glass,” boating is a metaphor for life slipping by–unnoticed by Alice but seen as deeply tragic by Carroll.

Posted in Carroll (Lewis) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Coping with Aging through Poetry

Wordsworth has written some of the world’s great poems for coping with aging.

Posted in Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Jane Eyre on Caring for the Sick

As I support people who are sick and aging, I turn to Jane Eyre as a model of one who considers such activity to be, not a self-sacrifice, but a gift to herself.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Federer, Unlike Ulysses, a Family Man Hero

Time and again with Roger Federer, thinking he is nearing his end, I have cited Tennyson’s “Ulysses.” He keeps proving me wrong. One reason may be because he has a different relationship with his family than Tennyson’s protagonist has.

Posted in Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Kranz & Muriel Spark on Insulting the Aged

Today I share a poker post from my 61-year-old novelist and poker playing friend Rachel Kranz, about the indignities of being called “young lady” while at the poker table. Muriel Spark similarly objects to the indignities heaped upon those who are aging in her novel “Memento Mori.”

Posted in Kranz (Rachel), Spark (Muriel) | Also tagged , , | Leave a comment

How to Keep Beauty from Vanishing Away

Gerard Manley Hopkins’s “The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo” works as a Lenten meditation on the beauty of God’s grace.

Posted in Hopkins (Gerard Manley) | Also tagged , , | 1 Comment

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