Tag Archives: World War I

Vets in WWI Documentary Do Not Age

Tuesday Last night Julia and I watched Peter Jackson’s extraordinary documentary about World War I in which he applied filmmaker’s magic to archival footage to create a sense of immediacy. By brightening dark shots and darkening overexposed ones, erasing scratches, evening out movement (World War I film was shot with hand-cranked cameras), turning long-shots into […]

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When Will We Ever Learn?

Alfred Noyes’s “On the Western Front” challenges us to learn from our wars.

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Wilfred Owen and the Hell of War

In “Mental Cases” Warren describes, as a nightmare, veterans suffering from PTSD and other war-related mental illnesses.

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Mourning the Mouthless Dead

Charles Hamilton Sorley, killed early in World War I, penned anti-war poetry that anticipated Wilfred Owen.

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Memorial Day: Anthem for Doomed Youth

With Memorial Day, there is the danger that we will romanticize the deaths of the fallen rather than face up to the full tragedy. This tension can be seen in a number of World War I poems, some of which romanticize the fallen while others dwell on the absurdity of their deaths.

Posted in Binyon (Laurence), Brooke (Rupert), Owen (Wilfred), Seeger (Alan) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Constellated Sounds of Bells

First Sunday after Christmas Sewanee, Tennessee, where I spend each Christmas, is a great place for bells and chimes. There is the 56-bell carillon in All Saints’ Chapel—once one of the largest in the world although probably no more—and the single Otey Parish bell. There are also the bells in Breslin Tower, which strike the […]

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Would I Were in Grantchester

The BBC series “Grantchester” owes its inspiration to a Rupert Brooke poem.

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Poetry Changed during World War I

The horrors of World War I created some great poetry. But not in its early days.

Posted in Brooke (Rupert), Freeman (John), Owen (Wilfred), Seeger (Alan) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Fantasy to the Rescue in Hard Times

Byatt’s book “The Children’s Hour” demonstrates many of the uses of fantasy.

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