Tag Archives: analysis

Let Me Not Love Thee If I Love Thee Not

George Herbert, never afraid to go toe-to-toe with God, grapples with his tormenting faith in “Affliction (1).”

Posted in Herbert (George) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

All Must Love the Human Form

In “The Divine Image,” Blake gives us a poem for our time, a call to pray for mercy, pity, peace, and love and to recognize the human form in diversity. In “The Human Abstract” he adds that prayer is not enough. It must be accompanied by human justice.

Posted in Blake (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In Memory of Daniel Berrigan

Daniel Berrigan, Jesuit activist and poet, died this past Saturday. His “A Dark Word” is a fitting way to note his passing.

Posted in Berrigan (Daniel) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Frolic Architecture of the Snow

Ralph Waldo Emerson sees a snow-storm as a master architect and “fierce artificer.”

Posted in Emerson (Ralph Waldo) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Advent and Horror at the Void

Donald Hall’s “Advent” captures the darkness of the season, linking death with birth.

Posted in Eliot (T.S.), Hall (Donald), Whitman (Walt) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Does It Mean to Hope against Hope?

What does it mean to hope against hope? Emily Dickinson and an analytic philosopher weigh in.

Posted in Dickinson (Emily) | Also tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Let Me Not Love Thee If I Love Thee Not

In threatening God that he will find another master, George Herbert sounds like a five-year-old threatening to run away from his mother. Deep down, he is acknowledging that he has no choice but to love God.

Posted in Herbert (George) | Also tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

  • AVAILABLE NOW!

  • Literature is as vital to our lives as food and shelter. Stories and poems help us work through the challenges we face, from everyday irritations to loneliness, heartache, and death. Literature is meant to mix it up with life. This website explores how it does so.

    Please feel free to e-mail me [rrbates (at) smcm (dot) edu]. I would be honored to hear your thoughts and questions about literature.

  • Sign up for weekly newsletter

    Your email will not be shared or sold.
    * = required field

    powered by MailChimp!
  • Twitter Authentication data is incomplete