Tag Archives: Seasons

Fall, Season for Beautiful Depression

Those suffering from depression will find a kindred spirit in this gorgeous St. Vincent Millay poem about autumn.

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Will Warm Days Never Cease?

Changes in climate can cause us to see classic poems in a new light. Case in point: Keats’s “To Autumn.”

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A Dreamy Day and Tranquilly I Lie

Here’s a relaxing poem by “hoosier poet” James Whitcomb Riley to welcome in the summer.

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Death Seems Comely at the Fall of the Leaf

The lure of many autumn poems lies in how they focus on a vanishing beauty. Dante Gabriel Rossetti finds death to be “a comely thing/In Autumn at the fall of the leaf.”

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The End of Summer

As we look back at the summer that is coming to an end, did we lose ourselves in a time of innocence or did we worry that time was passing too fast? This Rachel Hadas poem suspects the second.

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The Explosion of Summer

A Paul Laurence Dunbar poem to usher us into the summer. It begins with breathless waiting–and then everything explodes.

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Beholding the Summer Dead before Me

Shakespeare and Swinburne both write powerful poems about autumn.

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Walking Out in the Sun of October

As we enter October, revel in Dylan Thomas’ celebration of the season.

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The Violins of Autumn

I still remember memorizing, as a child in a French school, Paul Verlaine’s deliciously sad “Chanson d’automne.”

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Marianne’s Passion for Dead Leaves

In “Sense and Sensibility,” Austen gets us to reflect on the attractions and dangers of Nature.

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Blossoms Storm out of the Darkness

A perfect May poem from Mary Oliver.

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When the World Is Puddle Wonderful

It was raining yesterday in Pittsburgh on the first day of spring, bringing to mind one of the great poems about the season.

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It’s Spring and the Balloon Man Whistles

Here’s a delightful e.e. cummings poem to celebrate the first day of spring.

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Here Comes Autumn, Her Skirts A-Twirl

Autumn kicks off this week–Friday by some calculations–so here’s a poem by Scott Bates to celebrate her coming.

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Reading for Fun, the Best Education

In “Northanger Abbey,” Jane Austen advocates the ideal way to raise one’s kids: encourage them to read good literature and they will learn the life lessons that they need.

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Sumer is ycomen in

I’ve been grading student essays for so long that I’ve barely noticed the succession of gorgeous days that have been washing over us.  My seniors graduated Saturday, however, and yesterday I turned in the grades for the rest of my students, so I can finally acknowledge that “sumer is ycomen in.”  To remind myself and anyone […]

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