Tag Archives: wind in the willows

British and American Fantasy Contrasted

An “Atlantic” article argues that British fantasy is richer than American fantasy. I agree that they are different and that there are interesting reasons for those differences–but that American fantasy is vibrant as well.

Posted in Grahame (Kenneth), Lewis (C. S.), Tolkien (J.R.R.) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Joy Shall Be Yours in the Morning

Kenneth Grahame has a particularly beautiful Christmas story in “Wind in the Willows.”

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Books about People Reading Books

Books about books give readers a sense that they are part of a larger community.

Posted in Austen (Jane), Bronte (Charlotte), Dickens (Charles), Grahame (Kenneth), Milne (A. A.), Nesbitt (E.), Ransome (Arthur), Stevenson (Robert Louis), Twain (Mark) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pan’s Call–The Return of the Repressed

Pan became a major figure for turn-of-the-century poets and artists.

Posted in Bates (Scott) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Haunted by the Absent Music

“The Piper at the Gates of Dawn” episode in “Wind in the Willows” is a powerful expression of pantheism.

Posted in Finkelstein (Norman), Grahame (Kenneth) | Also tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Can the Mississippi Be Bullied?

It appears that New Orleans will be spared the flooding that has occurred further up river, thanks to the Army Corps of Engineers playing God and determining who gets protected and who goes under. While it’s certainly amazing what the Corps has accomplished, but one can’t help but think of Mark Twain’s skepticism in Life on the Mississippi almost 130 years ago.

Posted in Grahame (Kenneth), Twain (Mark) | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn

  I promised to post one of these days on Wind in the Willows, and all this talk of intimations of immortality has put me in mind of two remarkable chapters in that book.  What does Wordsworth mean by our “obstinate questionings of sense and outward things,” of our feelings that we are “moving about […]

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