Tag Archives: Ulysses

Is Old Age Becoming Overrated?

A “New Yorker” article on aging turns to literature to debunk the notion that aging is a good thing.

Posted in Aristotle, Bogan (Louise), Chaucer (Geoffrey), Johnson (Samuel), Plato, Shakespeare (William), Swift (Jonathan), Tennyson (Alfred Lord), Whitman (Walt), Yeats (William Butler) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fathers & Sons: He Goes His Way, I Mine

Wednesday The talk with my son that I described in Monday’s post reminded me of talks with my own father where I was sure he was wrong. I’ve since concluded that I was not as right as I thought I was and that our disagreements came down to our different life arcs. Our arguments came […]

Posted in Beckett (Samuel), Johnson (Samuel), Pascal (Blaise), Sartre (Jean Paul), Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Will Odysseus Shape 2020 Election?

Monday I won’t take credit for this but Washington Post’s Molly Roberts recently penned a very Better-Living-with Beowulf type column where she contrasted two Democratic presidential candidates by examining which version of the Odysseus/Ulysses story they prefer. Her piece gives me an excuse to apply other versions of the story to various 2020 contenders. Roberts […]

Posted in Homer, Joyce (James), Sophocles, Tennyson (Alfred Lord), Virgil | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pete Buttigieg on the Liffey

Friday If any of the Democratic presidential candidates want space on this blog before the first debate in June (I hear them clamoring now), they must mention literature. I wrote about Sherrod Brown when I discovered his love for Tolstoy (although he ultimately chose not to run), and now Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg gets a […]

Posted in Joyce (James) | Also tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Federer, Unlike Ulysses, a Family Man Hero

Time and again with Roger Federer, thinking he is nearing his end, I have cited Tennyson’s “Ulysses.” He keeps proving me wrong. One reason may be because he has a different relationship with his family than Tennyson’s protagonist has.

Posted in Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

One Equal Temper of Heroic Hearts

Federer and Nadal resumed their legendary rivalry in the Australian Open finals and played a match for the ages. They are both old in tennis terms and by all rights should have been surpassed by the next generation. Therefore Tennyson’s “Ulysses” seems the proper poem to acknowledge them.

Posted in Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

If Trump Tweeted Classic Lit Reviews…

Donald Trump has a very distinctive twitter style., one that would be great for classic book reviews. A BuzzFeed writer imagines how he might have reviewed “Hamlet,” “Tristram Shandy,” “Ulysses,” and other classics.

Posted in Hemingway (Ernest), Joyce (James), Shakespeare (William), Sterne (Lawrence), Tolkien (J.R.R.) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Peyton: Old Age Hath Yet His Honor

Two narratives clash on Super Bowl Sunday: the return of the king vs. the aging king that must be overthrown. Is Peyton Manning Odysseus and the Panthers the suitors? Or is he the dragon who must yield to the next generation?

Posted in Homer, Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Detecting the Person behind the Poetry

What we find when we look for the person behind the literary work.

Posted in Clifton (Lucille), Dickens (Charles), Fielding (Henry), Joyce (James) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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