Tag Archives: In Memoriam

My Son’s Death and Two Tree Poems

Today, the anniversary of my son’s death and also Arbor Day, I link the two days with two tree poems.

Posted in Berry (Wendell), Sartre (Jean Paul), Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ring Out the Old, Ring in the New

Tennyson and Longfellow have poems about bells ringing out an age of sin and suffering and ringing in new hope. Let them ring.

Posted in Longfellow (Henry Wadsworth), Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Remembering My Son 20 Years Later

Remembering my oldest son, who died 20 years ago, I turn to Shelley’s elegy for Keats.

Posted in Shelley (Percy Bysshe) | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Let Us Sail into the Promise of the Day

E. A. Robinson’s “Children of the Night” finds spiritual hope in a dark world.

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The Declining English Major

An English prof, sensing obsolescence, turns to “In Memoriam” (also Fowles, Wordsworth & Arnold).

Posted in Arnold (Matthew), Bennett (Alan), Donne (John), Fowles (John), Tennyson (Alfred Lord), Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Can Poetry Stop This Man?

Poetry may not have been able to stop Donald Trump, but it has its ways of mounting resistance. Poems by Tennyson, Auden, and Yeats explain how.

Posted in Auden (W. H.), Tennyson (Alfred Lord), Yeats (William Butler) | Also tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Love & the Red Fool-Fury of the Seine

Tennyson, responding to Paris massacres in the 1840s, asserts his faith in love and in social truth. Our challenge is to continue to believe this in the wake of the recent terror attacks.

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I Thought That Love Would Last Forever…

The death of a beloved cousin is throwing me into the primal pain described by Tennyson and Auden.

Posted in Auden (W. H.), Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Dear Son, Far Off, My Lost Desire

I understand more with each passing year what Tennyson means when he says his love “is vaster passion now” and how Hallam is thoroughly mixed with God and nature. Tennyson goes on to say that the moral will of humankind—the “living will” that is the best part of ourselves as a people—can finding footing on this spiritual rock. And that the living water that springs from this rock will “flow through our deeds and make them pure.”

Posted in Bates (Julia), Tennyson (Alfred Lord) | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

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