Tag Archives: Aeschylus

A Partial Defense of Plato’s Poet Ban

Perhaps Plato banished poets from his ideal society because he appreciated the destructive potential of stories. He’s relevant in light of today’s conspiracy theories.

Posted in Aeschylus, Euripides, Homer, Murakami (Haruki), Plato, Sophocles | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Our New President Understands Suffering

America has elected a president who understands suffering. A passage from Aeschylus’s “Agamemnon” seems right.

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Covid Costs Us Loved Ones’ Final Words

Among the many tragedies related to Covid is how family and friends are missing out on final words. Many literary works touch on the importance of this last encounter.

Posted in Aeschylus, Fielding (Henry), Morrison (Toni), Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Through Lit, We Learn Compassion

Tuesday My brother Sam, an enthusiastic Unitarian Universalist, gave me Karen Armstrong’s Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life for Christmas, and I was pleased that the author sees literature playing a major role. In today’s post I share how she draws on the ancient Greeks. Armstrong writes, “All faiths insist that compassion is the test […]

Posted in Aeschylus, Euripides, Homer, Sophocles, Wordsworth (William) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

#MeToo: A New Day for Cassandra

The prophetess Cassandra wasn’t listened to, but the #MeToo movement is changing that.

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Climate Scientists, Our Cassandras

Our climate scientists must feel like modern day Cassandras, as she appears in Aeschylus’s “Agamemnon” or Robinson Jeffers’s “Cassandra.” The prophetess knew what would happen but no one believed her. As a result, Troy fell.

Posted in Aeschylus, Jeffers (Robinson) | Also tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Drama Shows Us a Way Out of Violence

New School philosophy professor Simon Critchley argues that theatre and the arts in general are vital in helping societies understand and moderate endemic violence. Aeschylus’s “Oresteia” and Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” are particularly important.

Posted in Aeschylus, Shakespeare (William) | Also tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Germany vs. Greece, a Greek Tragedy

Novelist Tim McCarthy argues that the economic collision between Germany and Greece reenacts a number of the classic Greek tragedies, most notably “Oedipus” and “The Oresteia.” But Athena may not intervene in this instance.

Posted in Aeschylus, Sophocles | Also tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Top 10 Hellish Child-Parent Relationships

Top 10 Literary Parent-Child Relationships from Hell.

Posted in Aeschylus, Dostoevsky (Fyodor), Euripides, Lawrence (D. H.), O'Connor (Flannery), Plath (Sylvia), Roth (Philip K.), Shakespeare (William), Shelton (Richard), Sophocles | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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