Tag Archives: Lolita

Tennis Fiction and Osaka’s Brilliance

Literary fiction that mentions tennis can raise our appreciation of the game, including the play of figures like Naomi Osaka. Nabokov, Roth, and Wallace have all written about tennis.

Posted in Nabokov (Vladimir), Roth (Philip), Wallace (David Foster) | Also tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Is Sexist Lit Gaslighting Women?

A Guardian article argues that critical praise for sexist male authors valorizes patriarchal attitudes.

Posted in Bronte (Charlotte), Nabokov (Vladimir), Roth (Philip K.) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Roy Moore’s Obsession with Lolitas

To understand Judge Roy Moore’s predilection for teenage girls, read “Lolita.” Like Humbert Humbert, Moore is obsessed with purity.

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Invisible Man & Lolita Changed the ’50s

Ellison’s “Invisible Man” and Nabokov’s “Lolita” both challenged basic 1950s assumptions. The former changed public perceptions on what it meant to be black while the latter violated a tacit agreement not to go digging under neatly manicured lawns bordered by white picket fences.

Posted in Ellison (Ralph), Nabokov (Vladimir) | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Is Lit Useful? Let Me Count the Ways

A recent issue of “New Literary History” explores a number of ways that literature is useful.

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Novels: Training Ground for Citizenship

Novels have an inherently liberal dimension in that they get us to identify with people very different from us.

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Paterno’s Rapist Associate and Mr. Hyde

“Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” warns us that we are in danger of becoming monsters ourselves if we don’t hold on to our humanity when responding to monsters like alleged child molester Jerry Sandusky, close associate of Coach Joe Paterno.

Posted in Nabokov (Vladimir) | Also tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Kiki Ostrenga as Sister Carrie

Columnist David Brooks recently turned to Theodore Dreiser’s 1900 novel “Sister Carrie” in an attempt to make sense of the strange and disturbing case of 13-year-old internet celebrity Kiki Ostrenga.

Posted in Defoe (Daniel), Dreiser (Theodor), Nabokov (Vladimir) | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed

Iranian Women Identifying with Lolita

The kicker in the book title Reading Lolita in Iran is the shock of imagining people risking their freedom to read Nabokov’s scandalous masterpiece about an elderly writer who falls in love with twelve-year-old “nymphet” Dolores Hayes. What would anyone get out of that experience? The surprises keep on coming in Azar Nafisi’s book as […]

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